These Pathogens Can ESKAPE Most Antibiotics

These Pathogens Can ESKAPE Most Antibiotics

Antimicrobial resistance poses an ever-increasing healthcare threat, with pathogens evolving resistance faster than novel therapies are being developed. ESKAPE pathogens are just six of the many bacteria which have acquired the ability to escape the actions of current antibiotics. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), ESKAPE pathogens are responsible for over 2 million infections and approximately 20,000 deaths each year.

TransPharm Preclinical Solutions has a large library of multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains of ESKAPE pathogens, as well as extensive experience performing preclinical efficacy testing on novel drugs using rat and mouse models. We have worked with biotechnology companies across the globe to develop the next generation of therapeutics against infectious diseases. Learn more below and contact us today for a free, no-obligation quote.

E – Enterococcus faecium

Enterococcus faecium is a Gram-positive bacterium that colonizes the intestines. Although usually commensalit can infect wounds, the bloodstream, and urogenital tract. E. faecium is becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics, most notably vancomycin (vancomycin-resistant enterococci, or VRE).

TransPharm has validated E. faecium in the following models:
Gastrointestinal infection
Peritonitis
Additional validations are available upon request.

S – Staphylococcus aureus

Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that most commonly causes skin and soft tissue infections, but can also cause bacteremia, gastrointestinal illness, and pneumonia. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are becoming more common due to the misuse of antibiotics and are difficult to treat.

TransPharm has validated S. aureus in the following models:
Bacteremia
Dermal infection – Deep Wound
Dermal infection – Tape Stripping
Osteomyelitis
Peritonitis
Pulmonary infection
Soft tissue infection
Additional validations are available upon request.

K – Klebsiella pneumoniae

Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium in the Enterobacteriaceae family normally found in the intestines and stool. Healthy people usually do not contract Klebsiella infections, but patients with other health conditions are at higher risk for pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis caused by the bacteria. Some strains of K. pneumoniae have developed resistance to a class of antibiotics called carbapenems (carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE) and are associated with higher mortality.

TransPharm has validated K. pneumoniae in the following models:
Peritonitis
Pulmonary infection
Additional validations are available upon request.

A – Acinetobacter baumannii

Acinetobacter baumannii is an aerobic, Gram-negative bacterium capable of forming biofilms. It colonizes moist tissues such as mucous membranes, breaks in the skin, and the respiratory tract, all of which can lead to infection of the bloodstream (bacteremia). A. baumannii has become prevalent in US service members returning from duty in conflict zones such as Iraq.

TransPharm has validated A. baumannii in the following models:
Dermal infection – Deep Wound
Peritonitis
Pulmonary infection
Soft tissue infection
Additional validations are available upon request.

P – Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium commonly found in moist environments such as hot tubs and swimming pools. P. aeruginosa can cause bacteremia, pneumonia, and infections of the ears, eyes, bone, and urinary tract. These infections usually occur in hospitalized patients and those with weakened immune systems. Biofilm formation makes P. aeruginosa especially difficult to treat.

TransPharm has validated P. aeruginosa in the following models:
Bacteremia
Peritonitis
Pulmonary infection
Urinary tract infection
Additional validations are available upon request.

E – Enterobacter species

Enterobacter is a genus of Gram-negative bacteria that typically infect the respiratory and urinary tracts. The rise of ß-lactamase-resistant Enterobacter species is of particular concern due to increased transmission of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs).

TransPharm has validated Enterobacter cloacae in the following model:
Peritonitis
Additional validations are available upon request.

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